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World Trivia 

World trivia.

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World Trivia
World Trivia
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World Trivia

Who was Roderigo de Triana?
A: The sailor aboard Columbus's ship the Pinta, who made the first definite sighting of land in the New World on October 12, 1492.

What English king died from a lethal dose of morphine and cocaine administered by his personal physician --with the royal family's approval?
A: King George V--grandfather of Queen Elizabeth II--who was comatose and on his deathbed at the time.

Of what land was Helen of Troy queen?
A: Sparta.

What great ruler died of a nosebleed on his wedding night?
A: Attila the Hun, in A.D. 453.

What distinctive emblem, descriptive of his family name, was on Dutchman Peer Minuit's coat of arms?
A: A bat--symbolizing midnight, which in French is minuit.

What colors did Cleopatra paint her eyelids?
A: Lower lids, green; upper lids, blue-black.

Whom did Queen Elizabeth II name baron of Brighton, a peer of the realm, in 1970?
A: Laurence Olivier--or, more appropriately, Lord Olivier of Brighton. He was the first actor in English history to reach the House of Lords.

In what city did Polish-born Helena Rubinstein launch her cosmetics and beauty-care business?
A: Melbourne, Australia, in 1902. She opened a salon in London in 1908, in Paris in 1912 and in New York in 1915.

What did the ancient Japanese use to get bricks to the top of the tall buildings they constructed?
A: Kites.

the fiber of what plant was used to make the fine linen sheets upon which Mary, Queen of Scots, slept?
A: The stinging nettle.

In 1653, what city became the first in the world to install an organized system of roadside mailboxes?
A: Paris. The boxes, used for mail bound for other parts of the city, were emptied three times a day. They were in use only briefly and then abandoned because of vandalism.

According to legend, what did Cleopatra have her mattresses stuffed with every night?
A: Fresh roses.

In England, what's a bap?
A: A hamburger bun.

What do the French refer to when they speak of "La Manche"?
A: The English Channel. La manche means "the sleeve" in French.

In the U.S. a pig says "oink." How do the French describe the sound?
A: "Grwahng."

What's the British slang for white-collar worker?
A: Black-coat worker.

In the United States, a redcap is a baggage porter at an airport or a train or bus station. What's a redcap in Great Britain?
A: A military policeman.

What were the GPU, the NKVD and the MVD?
A: Earlier names of the KGB, the secret political police of the now dissolved Soviet Union.

Russian emperors were known as czars but what was a czarevich?
A: The eldest son of  a czar. The czar's wife was a czarina.

In medieval days, what were the narrow windows in thick castle walls called?
A: Loopholes. Modern-day loopholes are usually sought in contracts and laws.

The French were so taken with a particularly beautiful double pink rose back in 1797 that they named it Blushing Thigh of the Aroused Nymph. What was it renamed by the prim and proper English?
A: Great Maiden's Blush.


 

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